Government of Nepal
Ministry of Forests and Environment
Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation

विभागको ४२ औं स्थापना दिवसको औपचारिक कार्यक्रम सम्पन्न | विभागको स्थापना दिवसको उपलक्ष्यमा शुभ-कामना सन्देश | संरक्षित क्षेत्र व्यवस्थापन, अनुसन्धान तथा प्रशिक्षण केन्द्र उद्घाटन

Mammals

Manis pentadactyla/Manis crassicaudata

Indian Pangolin

Indian Pangolin (Manis crassicaudata), known as Tame Salak in Nepali, belongs to order Pholidota and family Manidae. Globally the species is native to Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. This species is distributed in lowland areas of southern and western Nepal. Within protected areas,this species has been recorded in Bardia, Banke, Chitwan, Parsa and Shukla Phanta National Parks. In Bara, Chitwan, Makwanpur and Parsa districts it is also recorded outside the protected areas. The global population of Indian Pangolin is unknown. The national population size of this species is not estimated yet, however, indicators point towards declining population. It is listed as endangered species by IUCN redlist categoty as it is it is suspected that its populations may decline by 50% in the future over a time frame of three generations (i.e. 2019–2043) due to overexploitation. National red list of mammals also categorizes it as an endangered species. The legal status of this species in Nepal is Protected (Appendix I) under the National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1973 and Appendix I in CITES law.

Chinese pangolin

Chinese Pangolin (Manis pentadactyla), known as Kalo Salak in Nepali; belongs to order Pholidota and family Mandiae. Globally, it is native to Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Hong Kong, India, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Nepal, Taiwan, China, Thailand and Viet Nam. A nation-wide survey of pangolins in Nepal unveiled the occurrence of Chinese Pangolin throughout Nepal largely distributed in human dominated landscapes of inner terai, mid-hills and mountains. Within protected areas of Nepal this species has been recorded from Kangchenjunga, Gaurishankar and Annapurna Conservation Areas, Makalu Barun , Sagarmatha, Chitwan, Parsa, Shivapuri-Nagarjun, and Sukla Phanta National Parks. In forests of Kathmandu and Baglung districts it is recorded from outside the protected areas as well. There is very little information available on population levels at any level (local, national or global) with few exceptions, and there is a paucity of research on abundance. In Nepal, its current population is estimated to consist of approximately 5,000 individuals and has been observed to be in decline. It is listed as Critically Endangered species by IUCN red list category as rate of declines exceeds 80% over a time frame of three generations (2019-2040) due to hunting and poaching across the species range for local and international use. However, national red list of mammals categorizes it as an endangered species. The legal status of this species in Nepal is Protected (Appendix I) under the National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1973 and Appendix I in CITES law.

Reference

  • Jnawali, S. R., Baral, H. S., Lee, S., Acharya, K. P., Upadhyay, G. P., Pandey, M., ... & Khatiwada, A. P. (2011). The Status of Nepal's Mammals: The National Red List Series-IUCN.